Capuchin Monket
"White faced capuchin"
Cebus capucinus
Photo courtesy/copyright
Raintree Nutrition

Capuchin Monkey
"Brown pale-fronted capuchin"
Cebus albifrons
Photo copyright Ivan Crab

Capuchin Monkey
"White faced capuchin"
Cebus capucinus
Photo courtesy/copyright Philip Greenspun


Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Chordata

Class

Mammalia

Order

Primates

Family

Cebidae

Subfamily

Cebinae



Name/Status
Source

Check source at right for various sub-species of Capuchin Monkey

Check 2000 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™ for updates

Other Species Of Capuchin Monkey - Not On IUCN Red List

Check 2000 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™ for updates



Capuchin Monkey

Habitat:

Mid-canopy of the Amazon Rainforest. Central and South America.

Diet:

Ripe fruits, leaves, insects and seeds. Small backboned animals.

Enemies:

Eagles, jaguars, and other larger birds.

Facts:

The Capuchin monkey belongs to the family, Cebidae. There are five different species of Capuchin monkeys.

They are also called "sapajou" and the "ring-tail monkey".

Named after a monk.

Generally, capuchins weigh between 2.5 - 4 kilograms, depending on the species.

Capuchins are arboreal (tree-dwelling) and are active day and night.

They are a very sociable animal and live in "groups". They "yell" to warn of an intruder.

Capuchins are great climbers and spend most of their time in trees. They usually come to the ground only to drink.

Capuchin mothers give birth to a single baby.

If the baby loses its mother, a different mother will bring it back.

They have a small poof on their head called a "ruff".

Capuchins have very nimble fingers and they have a prehensile tail.

They have a life span of 35-45 years.

Since they eat a lot of fruit and seeds, Capuchins are "seed dispersers" for many rainforest plants and trees.



Additional Information
Encarta
Primate Info Net Links
Primate Info Net (All Capuchin species are here)


Copyright © 1999 - 2003
Animals Of The Rainforest/Ron Kalasinskas, All rights reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.
Animals Of The Rainforest Homepage