Satin Bowerbird
"Satin Bowerbird"
Ptilonorhycnhus violaceus

Photo © CORBIS, Courtesy Ron Kalasinskas


Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Chordata

Class

Aves

Order

Passeriformes

Family

Ptilonorhynchidae



Name/Status
Source

Satin Bowerbird - Not On IUCN Red List

Check 2000 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™ for updates



Satin Bowerbird

Habitat:

Rainforests and eucalyptus forests of North Queensland, Australia.

Diet:

Fruits, leaves, and some insects.

Enemies:

Larger birds of prey and reptiles.

Facts:

The Satin bowerbird belongs to the Ptilonorhynchidae family of birds, of which there are about 20 different species.

Bowerbirds are famous for their building of very elaborate and spectacular displays ("bowers").

Satin bowerbirds are about 10 - 13 inches in length. The males are black with a blue/purple satin-like look.

The females do not look like the males and are a duller brownish color.

They are well built with strong bills and legs.

Satin bowerbirds love the color "blue", and the males try to attract females by building a "bower" decorated with blue objects.

The male will use any kind of blue object he can find for his bower such as: buttons, batteries, pens, toothbrushes, flowers, ribbons, paper, berries, bottle caps, and much more.

Once the bower is built the male will dance around the bower "showing it off", trying to attract a mate.

Satin bowerbirds have distinctive calls and can even mimic other birds.



Additional Information
Monterey Bay
Lamington National Park


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