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W. D. Morris, '92, P '22, '26 is 2020 Weston Award Honoree

News Type:  All School Alumni Date:  Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Heathwood alumnus and parent W.D. Morris, Jr. is this year's recipient of the Anne Thornhill Weston Alumni Award.

Named in honor of Anne Weston (Heathwood parent 2003 & 2007), long time science teacher and Upper School Head and Assistant Headmaster from 1978-2013, the Weston Award is given annually to a Heathwood Hall graduate who has followed in the footsteps of Anne Weston and distinguished him or herself in the area of community service and shared in Anne’s belief in the dignity of all people and in the mission of Episcopal schools to educate and serve with faith, hope, and love.

W.D., a 1992 Heathwood graduate whose sons William ('22) and Henry ('26) currently attend the school, exemplifies the spirit of the Weston Award through his work as a youth sports coach, his service to Heathwood, and his commitment to serving the greater community. He is a church league basketball coach, a youth baseball coach--and the 2018 winner of PBL's Medlin/Scurry Award for outstanding coaching--and a PBL board member. He is Treasurer of the Highlander Club, a Sunday School Teacher at Eastminster Presbyterian Churh, and a longtime meber of the Coastal Conservation Association State Board, who in 2013 earned the CCA South Carolina Volunteer of the Year Award given in recognition of his outstanding commitment to CCA and his tireless dedication to the advancement of the principles and mission of the association. 

"As a parent volunteer, WD is omnipresent and always willing to throw an oar in the water," said Heathwood Head of School Chris Hinchey. "There is not a friendlier, more selfless, gracious, and humble graduate than WD Morris. He is a gentlemen, a friend, and a Highlander committed to a life of service."

 

Heathwood Alumni Launch Website to Connect Health Workers with Masks

News Type:  All School Alumni Date:  Monday, April 20, 2020

Heathwood alumni Sanford and Townsend Zeigler have combined their talents and expertise to launch a website, https://www.heroesneedmasks.com/, that serves as a nationwide resource connecting healthcare providers who need personal protective equipment (PPE) with those who are able to provide it.

The website came about after Sanford Zeigler, a heart surgeon who's medical director of the Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, posted on social media about the needs of the medical community. The response was a flood of donations, and Sanford's brother Townsend, who works in marketing in Nashville, saw an opportunity to get the word out even further by creating a website.

On the site are lists of needed supplies and locations where they can be dropped off, as well as a form healthcare providers can fill out to request PPE. (And for those in the Midlands who may have PPE available for donation, Lexington Medical Center is one of their drop-off sites.)

We're proud that these alumni are making such a difference in this time of critical need.

 

 

"Every Challenge Teaches You Something New About Yourself": An Interview With New Heathwood Basketball Coach Brionna Dickerson Zimmerman

News Type:  All School Alumni Date:  Thursday, April 16, 2020

Heathwood alumna Brionna Dickerson Zimmerman, '05, returns to the Athletic Center this year as Head Women's Basketball Coach after a standout career at the University of South Carolina and several years of coaching AAU ball. In addition to being Heathwood's all-time points leader during her years as a Highlander, Brionna is already a familiar face on campus thanks to her current role as Heathwood's Events Coordinator and Development Associate.

We asked Brionna to share her coaching philosophy, her proudest moment as a player, and what it was like to play at Carolina for current National Coach of the Year Dawn Staley. Here she also explains why she's currently glued to her TV whenever The Voice is on, and why you may sometimes here her refered to on campus as "Coach Mom."

 

--As a former Heathwood player, what excited you most about coming back to the program as a coach? 

It's exciting for me to be able to come back where it all started. Not only that, but I'm most excited about the chance for my son to see me coach. My family is a basketball family, obviously with a son named after Kobe Bryant and daughters named after Michael Jordan and Skylar Diggins, so the game has always been in my blood. I am grateful for him to see me in my element as a coach. He's even asked if he should call me Coach Mom :)

 

--What's your favorite thing about coaching? 

My favorite thing about coaching is being able to inspire young people. Being an athlete has a different meaning for everyone who plays a sport, and my goal is always to inspire my team to step outside of their comfort zone and unlock the person inside of them that they didn't know was there. Basketball brings out so many wonderful characteristics in a person...character, drive, competitiveness... and these are all things that you can't teach. It lies in all of us, it just takes the right inspiration to make it come out.

 

--How would you describe your coaching philosophy? 

My coaching philosophy is based on three key areas that can lead to success...commitment, communication and coachability. These three things will help me build an "All In" mentally. A big part of that is being relatable to my team and having the perspective of someone who has been in their shoes as a former Heathwood basketball player. At the end of the season, I want them all to be able to look back and see growth in themselves as an athlete and as a person.

 

--You played in college for this year's national Coach of the Year, Dawn Staley. What have you learned from her that you'll carry into your role at Heathwood? 

Coach Staley has been one of my role models since watching her play for the Charlotte Sting in the WNBA. Since the day she stepped on campus her advice to me has always been to never back down and to never shy away from a challenge. She said things may not always go in your favor but every challenge teaches you something new about yourself. That is something that I have always kept with me into adulthood, motherhood, and coaching. 

 

--What was your proudest moment as a Heathwood player? 

My proudest moment as a player was getting to make the first shot in the Athletic Center when it opened. It was completed my Senior year, and I was injured in an away scrimmage right before our first home game. It was definitely an emotional experience. Now I get a chance to coach in a building that I didn't actually get to play in so things have seemed to come full circle.

 

--What have you enjoyed most about your role as Heathwood's Event Coordinator and Development Associate? 

I have enjoyed getting an opportunity to work with all the different constituencies at Heathwood, including alumni, parents and grandparents. My role allows me to help coordinate events for them by learning what they love to do and love about Heathwood and incorporating that knowledge into making our events more successful. I'd have to say that my favorite event by far is the auction, and although we weren't able to physically gather this year, our community still made our fundraising efforts a great success!

 

--What advice do you have for students who want to play basketball for Heathwood next year but are limited in what training they can do right now because of social distancing? 

Although being in the gym is out of our control right now, there are still ways to prepare your body and mind for next season. Ball handling, passing and agility drills don't require having a basketball goal at home and this is a great time to work on maintaining your strengths and improving your weaknesses.

 

--What's one thing about you that we might be surprised to know? 

I had my cousin sing at my wedding because he is an amazing vocalist. He is currently on NBC's The Voice and has made it 3 rounds already. His name is Camm Wess, and he was on Team John Legend. It has been a really cool experience supporting him and voting on Monday nights to help him win the competition!

You can read more about Coach Zimmerman and her new role in Heathwood Athletics here.

 

Heathwood Students Begin Remote Learning in Response to Covid-19 Pandemic

News Type:  All School Date:  Wednesday, March 25, 2020

When the Covid-19 pandemic forced the closure of Heathwood’s campus on March 16, faculty and students at all grade levels transitioned into remote learning protocols that featured both synchronous (live and interactive) and asynchronous experiences. While the exact nature of those experiences varies considerably from one grade level to another, students are continuing to cover much of the same material they would have learned in their traditional classrooms, largely thanks to exceptional work on the part of Heathwood’s tech team and a can-do spirit on the part of faculty and students.

Preparations for remote learning began weeks before the coronavirus hit South Carolina, as it became evident that schools in other nations were having to close in response to the virus and Heathwood might have to do the same. Division heads met with faculty to map out exactly what remote learning might look like, the tech team held training sessions on Google Meet and other options that facilitate virtual classrooms, and each division surveyed families to learn more about their expectations, challenges, and capabilities in a remote learning situation.

By the time Heathwood’s Leadership Team determined, on March 15, that it was no longer feasible to keep the campus open for the foreseeable future, detailed plans were thus in place for remote learning experiences in each division. Students in younger grades, for example, were given assignments to complete at home that were very similar to what they’d be doing at school, while older students continued to attend classes virtually, on a set schedule.

Initially scheduled for March 16-April 3, remote learning has now been extended to May 1 in response to SC Governor Henry McMaster's order that all public schools in teh state remain closed until April 30.

While the campus closure was done with a heavy heart, Head of School Chris Hinchey notes that the way students, teachers, and families have risen to the challenge says great things about the Heathwood community: 

“Developing our Remote Learning program was a herculean effort, and our faculty and division administrators deserve our gratitude and appreciation.  Transitioning from our traditional face-to-face learning program into a remote learning program is challenging, but to do it in one week - under the pressure of a growing pandemic while delivering a full day of classes and extra-curriculars – is monumental.  Additionally, our families have been so supportive and flexible and once again the Heathwood community has risen to the challenge.

“Based on the strong and trusting relationships with our students and parents and the professionalism of our educators,” Mr. Hinchey added, “we are getting great feedback and making substantive and positive changes.”

To learn more about Heathwood’s remote learning experience, visit the Covid-19 page on our website, where there are links to letters from each division head that provide extensive details on the process for that division.

Lower School LEAP Week: Learning, Engagement, Action, Possibilities

News Type:  All School Date:  Friday, March 6, 2020

From gardening to tennis to exploring Latin America and Spain, from Comic Book Creations to Colonial and Native American Activities to Healthy Minds and Healthy Hearts, the Lower School's LEAP Week short classes give students unique opportunities to step out of the traditional classroom and explore specific interests or discover new passions.

For the Week of March 2-6, all Lower School students spent the afternoon taking two hour-long classes of their choice. In Kid Authors, students explored the elements of storytelling, then wrote and illustrated their own books. Popular Mechanics focused on bridge-building, while Beautiful Butterflies allowed students to learn all about the different types of butterflies than can be seen in the Midlands.Classes like volleyball, baseball, and Ultimate P.E. created extra opportunities for students to get physical, while classes in sign language, cheerleading, and ballet allowed participants to develop new skills or enhance existing ones. In all, some LEAP Week courses were offered this year.

LEAP (Learning, Engagement, Action, Possibilities) Week is an annual program that's designed to expand learning opportunities for students in grades K-4 beyond the traditional classroom, just as Winterim does for Upper School students during the same week.

 

See the full gallery of LEAP Week photos here.

Innovation with Impact: U.S. Deputy Secretary of Education Visits Heathwood to Explore Signature Programs

News Type:  All School Date:  Thursday, February 13, 2020

Heathwood was honored to host U.S. Deputy Secretary of Education Mick Zais on February 12 as he toured the school to learn about innovative Heathwood programs and their impacts on students.

Dr. Zais, a retired Army General who has also served as President of Newberry College and S.C. Superintendent of Education, came to Heathwood in support of the Department of Education’s goal of diversifying K-12 educational offerings to better meet the diverse needs of American students. To that end, he heard from Heathwood students, teachers, and parents about their experiences with signature Heathwood programs such as Mindful in the Hall, Senior Exhibition, and Winterim.

“I used to get really stressed before quizzes, tests, and sporting events,” seventh grader Robert Sims Tighe told Zais. “But the deep breathing and other things I’ve learned through the Mindfulness program have helped me be a lot more calm and focused.”

That, said Middle School Head Suzanne Nagy, is one of the main goals of the Mindful in the Hall program, which was developed in response to growing levels of anxiety among students who are grappling with the challenges of social media and other facets of their digital lives on top of the perpetual stressors of adolescence. “We’re working with kids in a variety of ways to help them calm their nervous systems so they can be more successful in school and in their extracurriculars,” Mrs. Nagy said. “And so far we’re seeing great results.”

Likewise, Upper School Head George Scouten and Upper School Dean of Students and 12th grade English Teacher Elise Hagstette explained how Heathwood’s longstanding Senior Exhibition program equips students for success in college-level coursework and beyond. Because the program requires all Heathwood seniors to write and present a thesis-type piece of original research, they learn skills that many students are lacking when they arrive in college: “They’re putting together an advisory committee, including taking the initiative to reach out to an outside expert,” Dr. Scouten said. “They’re learning how to manage schedules, meet a series of deadlines, put together a prospectus, research, write, and present a lengthy paper – all skills that our graduates tell us over and over prepared them very well for college and their careers.”

Dr. Zais concurred, citing a study that found effective written and oral communication skills are increasingly important as a military officer’s career progresses. Having visited almost 300 schools during his tenure with the Department of Education, he also noted that he’s learned that really good schools know how to encourage parents to be involved in their children’s educations, something the parents in attendance said they appreciated about Heathwood.

Apart from the value of signature programs that create significant opportunities for personal and intellectual growth, the theme that emerged most clearly from the session was the importance of relationships in creating a strong learning environment. Students and teachers alike cited small classes and a school culture of respect for the value of all as making a big difference in the academic experience at Heathwood. For example, said Upper School English Teacher Sally Plowden, because her daughters felt respected by their teachers when they were Heathwood students, they were very comfortable connecting with professors when they got to college in a way that many students are not. “It was like they just took Heathwood with them when they went to college,” she said. “And that made them very successful in the college classroom.”

Highlanders Receive Early-Season Honors

News Type:  All School Athletics Date:  Thursday, September 6, 2018 Byline:  Early in the 2018 Fall season, two Highlanders have been recognized for their performances state-wide!

The beginning to the 2018-19 academic year has seen several of our Athletic teams and athletes earn strong performances, both on campus and throughout the area and state!  For two athletes, these performances have been recognized by different media outlets, earning accolades for both!



Rondarius Porter ('22) was named Midlands Player of the Week by The State Newspaper following the Varsity Football team's 13-12 overtime win in Week 2 over Wilson Hall in Sumter!  Porter helped limit the Barons to just two touchdowns over the course of the game, collecting 13 tackles, 3 tackles for loss, and 2 sacks.  He is currently ranked in the top 5 in the midlands in sacks for the season. 

Jais Ward ('24) earned the SCRunners.com/MileSplit SC Girls Performance of the Week, after claiming the Skyhawk Invitational individual title.  In just her first competition as a Varsity runner, Ward ran a blazing 19:24 to continue the tradition of Highlander Girls runners claiming the title on the Hammond campus.  She continues her terrific work from the offseason, which included a 4th place finish at the Junior Olympic National meet. 

2018 Highlander Boys Golf: All In The Family

News Type:  All School Athletics Date:  Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Since Coach Lynn Humphrey took over the golf program in the mid-90’s, she’s had brothers, sisters, even twins, but never what she’s encountered this season.

 

The Boys Golf program currently features three different sets of brothers as the Lucas’ (senior Daniel and freshman James), Lamar’s (freshman William and 6th-grader Thomas), and King’s (senior Robert, and sophomore twins Manning and McLain) are all competing for the Highlanders this spring.  To say that the teammates are close is certainly an understatement.

 

Daniel Lucas and Robert King join Rox Pollard as the senior leaders on this year’s team but have embraced the concept of leading by example well before this season.  “I try to take what I’ve learned and pass it down,” Lucas said.  “I think (James) will be able to take a lot away from what seeing what I’ve done and how, and it’s just more special that we did it together.”

 

For King, the golf dynamic is the perfect sport for the camaraderie and competitiveness that exists between the three.  “For us, we’ve always been competitive.  Whether it was playing football or basketball at home, we always wanted each other to play well, but wanted to win in everything.  We help each other -- which is cool, but it’s an added aspect being able to live with two of your teammates.”

For freshman William Lamar, being of the younger members of the team hasn’t taken anything away from his experience as the older brother.  “Thomas is going to be a much better golfer than I am, but I try to set a good example with how I do things.  We’ve grown up playing together on the course, so we both ask each other a lot of questions about our swings and can help each other out.”

Being the younger brothers of an older teammate can be a challenging endeavor.  Often times, athletes can feel the pressure of having the “live up” to the expectations of their brothers’ careers, but for this group, the positives have outweighed any potential negatives.

 

“We’re very close,” Manning King shared.  “We’re around each other so much, it’s weird when we’re not together.  So, whether we’re at practice or a game, we’re comfortable.” 

 

“There will be moments on the course where Manning or Robert will do something good, and I’ll just look at them and nod, and I can see them excited.  It’s a huge bonus having each other on the course, because we all want each other to do well.” McLain King added.

For James Lucas, it’s been more than just the interaction on the course.  “On the way home from matches is nice to be able talk about shots, and really just to ride home together in general.”  The Lucas brothers are no strangers to togetherness, as James mentioned that Daniel has been a part of every team he’s joined.  That bond has helped propel a group with a strong mix of youth and experience to a current second-place standing in region play.

 

6th grader Thomas Lamar is perhaps the youngest member of the golf program, paired with what may be the highest ceiling in terms of golfing ability.  Of the three sets of brothers, he is also the only one who does not share the same campus building as his brother, so there time together on the course replaces what may be lost during the day.  “He’s my brother and we do a lot together.  I look up to him, and he’s the first person I go to when I have questions,” Thomas adds.  Even in their actions, you can see the bond between the Lamar boys.  As they entered a room on a Friday afternoon, the brothers, donning matching gray HH polos and khaki shorts, shared the same stance and spoke with the same tone, with younger brother Thomas looking to older brother William after answers, always getting a smiling look of pride in return.

 

As the season progresses towards its conclusion, the team will prepare for a run at a State Championship at the SCISA Golf Competition at the Hackler Course in Conway.  The final round will see not only the completion of the season, but the beginning of a dynamic shift.  Robert King is Clemson-bound in the fall, while Daniel Lucas will join the golf team at Columbia International.  Two households accustomed to the family bond of brotherhood will see slight separation, but all are confident that the bond will go unbroken.

 

“I think it’ll be a big change, because he’s not only my ride home, but he’s been on every team I’ve ever played on.  It’ll take some getting used to,” James Lucas shared.  Daniel knows that James will be prepared for the change.  “The competition between the two of us is interesting, he’s continuing to progress and will be a lot better than I was when he’s done playing here.  He may get an opportunity to play collegiate golf, and take advantage of that, but I think he’ll definitely blaze his own trail.”

Robert King knows the twins will have an adjustment period but won’t be completely removed from their interactions.  “At home, they’re going to lose a lot of stuff.  They usually count on me to make sure things are set and that messages from our parents get to them.

 

We’ll still be in touch, because we’re all very close.  I have other friends who aren’t as close to their brothers, but we’re always going to be friends.  I’ll definitely miss them a lot, but I won’t be too far away.”

 

Manning & McLain are apart often, but they know the difference of moving from three to two at home will bring change.  “Robert will go out with his other friends, spend the day with his buddies, so it’s not too unnatural for us to be doing different things.  But we are together a lot, and it will be different not having him there to really push us,” McLain says.

 

For Manning, the biggest difference will be in the competition aspect.  “McLain and I, being twins, always compete.  But Robert is always right there with us.  No matter what, we want to beat him.  So, when we’re on the course together now, we want to beat him, but also want him to do really well.

 

Regardless of how the season ends, these families will share that unique opportunity to have been together, creating memories that will last a lifetime.  But before the moments turn to memories, there’s the every going competition aspect.  For Daniel Lucas, he knows that the team is headed in the right direction.  “Seeing the guys that are with us now, with the young guys coming up, the future is definitely bright.  They’ll know how to work together and do something special.”

 

Until then, the King brothers have unfinished business.  The night before a weekend round between the three, all were asked who the favorite to win was:

 

Robert: “Me.”

Manning: “Me.”

McLain: “Me. Easily.”

 

It’s fair to say that the win will stay in the family.

 

2018 Highlander Boys Golf: All In The Family

News Type:  All School Athletics Date:  Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Since Coach Lynn Humphrey took over the golf program in the mid-90’s, she’s had brothers, sisters, even twins, but never what she’s encountered this season.

 

The Boys Golf program currently features three different sets of brothers as the Lucas’ (senior Daniel and freshman James), Lamar’s (freshman William and 6th-grader Thomas), and King’s (senior Robert, and sophomore twins Manning and McLain) are all competing for the Highlanders this spring.  To say that the teammates are close is certainly an understatement.

 

Daniel Lucas and Robert King join Rox Pollard as the senior leaders on this year’s team but have embraced the concept of leading by example well before this season.  “I try to take what I’ve learned and pass it down,” Lucas said.  “I think (James) will be able to take a lot away from what seeing what I’ve done and how, and it’s just more special that we did it together.”

 

For King, the golf dynamic is the perfect sport for the camaraderie and competitiveness that exists between the three.  “For us, we’ve always been competitive.  Whether it was playing football or basketball at home, we always wanted each other to play well, but wanted to win in everything.  We help each other -- which is cool, but it’s an added aspect being able to live with two of your teammates.”

For freshman William Lamar, being of the younger members of the team hasn’t taken anything away from his experience as the older brother.  “Thomas is going to be a much better golfer than I am, but I try to set a good example with how I do things.  We’ve grown up playing together on the course, so we both ask each other a lot of questions about our swings and can help each other out.”

Being the younger brothers of an older teammate can be a challenging endeavor.  Often times, athletes can feel the pressure of having the “live up” to the expectations of their brothers’ careers, but for this group, the positives have outweighed any potential negatives.

 

“We’re very close,” Manning King shared.  “We’re around each other so much, it’s weird when we’re not together.  So, whether we’re at practice or a game, we’re comfortable.” 

 

“There will be moments on the course where Manning or Robert will do something good, and I’ll just look at them and nod, and I can see them excited.  It’s a huge bonus having each other on the course, because we all want each other to do well.” McLain King added.

For James Lucas, it’s been more than just the interaction on the course.  “On the way home from matches is nice to be able talk about shots, and really just to ride home together in general.”  The Lucas brothers are no strangers to togetherness, as James mentioned that Daniel has been a part of every team he’s joined.  That bond has helped propel a group with a strong mix of youth and experience to a current second-place standing in region play.

 

6th grader Thomas Lamar is perhaps the youngest member of the golf program, paired with what may be the highest ceiling in terms of golfing ability.  Of the three sets of brothers, he is also the only one who does not share the same campus building as his brother, so there time together on the course replaces what may be lost during the day.  “He’s my brother and we do a lot together.  I look up to him, and he’s the first person I go to when I have questions,” Thomas adds.  Even in their actions, you can see the bond between the Lamar boys.  As they entered a room on a Friday afternoon, the brothers, donning matching gray HH polos and khaki shorts, shared the same stance and spoke with the same tone, with younger brother Thomas looking to older brother William after answers, always getting a smiling look of pride in return.

 

As the season progresses towards its conclusion, the team will prepare for a run at a State Championship at the SCISA Golf Competition at the Hackler Course in Conway.  The final round will see not only the completion of the season, but the beginning of a dynamic shift.  Robert King is Clemson-bound in the fall, while Daniel Lucas will join the golf team at Columbia International.  Two households accustomed to the family bond of brotherhood will see slight separation, but all are confident that the bond will go unbroken.

 

“I think it’ll be a big change, because he’s not only my ride home, but he’s been on every team I’ve ever played on.  It’ll take some getting used to,” James Lucas shared.  Daniel knows that James will be prepared for the change.  “The competition between the two of us is interesting, he’s continuing to progress and will be a lot better than I was when he’s done playing here.  He may get an opportunity to play collegiate golf, and take advantage of that, but I think he’ll definitely blaze his own trail.”

Robert King knows the twins will have an adjustment period but won’t be completely removed from their interactions.  “At home, they’re going to lose a lot of stuff.  They usually count on me to make sure things are set and that messages from our parents get to them.

 

We’ll still be in touch, because we’re all very close.  I have other friends who aren’t as close to their brothers, but we’re always going to be friends.  I’ll definitely miss them a lot, but I won’t be too far away.”

 

Manning & McLain are apart often, but they know the difference of moving from three to two at home will bring change.  “Robert will go out with his other friends, spend the day with his buddies, so it’s not too unnatural for us to be doing different things.  But we are together a lot, and it will be different not having him there to really push us,” McLain says.

 

For Manning, the biggest difference will be in the competition aspect.  “McLain and I, being twins, always compete.  But Robert is always right there with us.  No matter what, we want to beat him.  So, when we’re on the course together now, we want to beat him, but also want him to do really well.

 

Regardless of how the season ends, these families will share that unique opportunity to have been together, creating memories that will last a lifetime.  But before the moments turn to memories, there’s the every going competition aspect.  For Daniel Lucas, he knows that the team is headed in the right direction.  “Seeing the guys that are with us now, with the young guys coming up, the future is definitely bright.  They’ll know how to work together and do something special.”

 

Until then, the King brothers have unfinished business.  The night before a weekend round between the three, all were asked who the favorite to win was:

 

Robert: “Me.”

Manning: “Me.”

McLain: “Me. Easily.”

 

It’s fair to say that the win will stay in the family.

2018 Highlander Boys Golf: All In The Family

News Type:  All School Athletics Date:  Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Since Coach Lynn Humphrey took over the golf program in the mid-90’s, she’s had brothers, sisters, even twins, but never what she’s encountered this season.

 

The Boys Golf program currently features three different sets of brothers as the Lucas’ (senior Daniel and freshman James), Lamar’s (freshman William and 6th-grader Thomas), and King’s (senior Robert, and sophomore twins Manning and McLain) are all competing for the Highlanders this spring.  To say that the teammates are close is certainly an understatement.

 

Daniel Lucas and Robert King join Rox Pollard as the senior leaders on this year’s team but have embraced the concept of leading by example well before this season.  “I try to take what I’ve learned and pass it down,” Lucas said.  “I think (James) will be able to take a lot away from what seeing what I’ve done and how, and it’s just more special that we did it together.”

 

For King, the golf dynamic is the perfect sport for the camaraderie and competitiveness that exists between the three.  “For us, we’ve always been competitive.  Whether it was playing football or basketball at home, we always wanted each other to play well, but wanted to win in everything.  We help each other -- which is cool, but it’s an added aspect being able to live with two of your teammates.”

For freshman William Lamar, being of the younger members of the team hasn’t taken anything away from his experience as the older brother.  “Thomas is going to be a much better golfer than I am, but I try to set a good example with how I do things.  We’ve grown up playing together on the course, so we both ask each other a lot of questions about our swings and can help each other out.”

Being the younger brothers of an older teammate can be a challenging endeavor.  Often times, athletes can feel the pressure of having the “live up” to the expectations of their brothers’ careers, but for this group, the positives have outweighed any potential negatives.

 

“We’re very close,” Manning King shared.  “We’re around each other so much, it’s weird when we’re not together.  So, whether we’re at practice or a game, we’re comfortable.” 

 

“There will be moments on the course where Manning or Robert will do something good, and I’ll just look at them and nod, and I can see them excited.  It’s a huge bonus having each other on the course, because we all want each other to do well.” McLain King added.

For James Lucas, it’s been more than just the interaction on the course.  “On the way home from matches is nice to be able talk about shots, and really just to ride home together in general.”  The Lucas brothers are no strangers to togetherness, as James mentioned that Daniel has been a part of every team he’s joined.  That bond has helped propel a group with a strong mix of youth and experience to a current second-place standing in region play.

 

6th grader Thomas Lamar is perhaps the youngest member of the golf program, paired with what may be the highest ceiling in terms of golfing ability.  Of the three sets of brothers, he is also the only one who does not share the same campus building as his brother, so their time together on the course replaces what may be lost during the day.  “He’s my brother and we do a lot together.  I look up to him, and he’s the first person I go to when I have questions,” Thomas adds.  Even in their actions, you can see the bond between the Lamar boys.  As they entered a room on a Friday afternoon, the brothers, donning matching gray HH polos and khaki shorts, shared the same stance and spoke with the same tone, with younger brother Thomas looking to older brother William after answers, always getting a smiling look of pride in return.

 

As the season progresses towards its conclusion, the team will prepare for a run at a State Championship at the SCISA Golf Competition at the Hackler Course in Conway.  The final round will see not only the completion of the season, but the beginning of a dynamic shift.  Robert King is Clemson-bound in the fall, while Daniel Lucas will join the golf team at Columbia International.  Two households accustomed to the family bond of brotherhood will see slight separation, but all are confident that the bond will go unbroken.

 

“I think it’ll be a big change, because he’s not only my ride home, but he’s been on every team I’ve ever played on.  It’ll take some getting used to,” James Lucas shared.  Daniel knows that James will be prepared for the change.  “The competition between the two of us is interesting, he’s continuing to progress and will be a lot better than I was when he’s done playing here.  He may get an opportunity to play collegiate golf, and take advantage of that, but I think he’ll definitely blaze his own trail.”

Robert King knows the twins will have an adjustment period but won’t be completely removed from their interactions.  “At home, they’re going to lose a lot of stuff.  They usually count on me to make sure things are set and that messages from our parents get to them.

 

We’ll still be in touch, because we’re all very close.  I have other friends who aren’t as close to their brothers, but we’re always going to be friends.  I’ll definitely miss them a lot, but I won’t be too far away.”

 

Manning & McLain are apart often, but they know the difference of moving from three to two at home will bring change.  “Robert will go out with his other friends, spend the day with his buddies, so it’s not too unnatural for us to be doing different things.  But we are together a lot, and it will be different not having him there to really push us,” McLain says.

 

For Manning, the biggest difference will be in the competition aspect.  “McLain and I, being twins, always compete.  But Robert is always right there with us.  No matter what, we want to beat him.  So, when we’re on the course together now, we want to beat him, but also want him to do really well.

 

Regardless of how the season ends, these families will share that unique opportunity to have been together, creating memories that will last a lifetime.  But before the moments turn to memories, there’s the every going competition aspect.  For Daniel Lucas, he knows that the team is headed in the right direction.  “Seeing the guys that are with us now, with the young guys coming up, the future is definitely bright.  They’ll know how to work together and do something special.”

 

Until then, the King brothers have unfinished business.  The night before a weekend round between the three, all were asked who the favorite to win was:

 

Robert: “Me.”

Manning: “Me.”

McLain: “Me. Easily.”

 

It’s fair to say that the win will stay in the family.

 

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